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Price is Right

I’ve never known the maiden name of my 3x great grandmother, Mary Waspe.

It wasn’t that I didn’t want to know, but I’ve been busy with other lines and for once I’m actually trying to stick to the research projects I’m setting. I can get sucked into rabbit holes of “oh but what about…” really easily.

Setting specific research goals and creating projects is one way I’m trying to keep myself on firm ground. I have enough trouble with the kids distracting me without letting myself get distracted by … uh … myself.

But I just can’t stand not knowing. Makes me twitchy.

So I got one of those shaking leaves on Ancestry when I was having a weak moment and thought I’d take just a couple minutes to see what I could find.

The Internets seemed to think her maiden name was Mary Pritchard, but I couldn’t find confirmation. None of the online trees in my “Hints” had any proof of her maiden name.

I thought I’d treat this as a clue and see if I could come to a conclusion one way or another: either prove or disprove a connection to the Pritchard family.

I had already gathered some clues of my own. Mary had married into my direct paternal line. I’d met (online first, then in real life) an English half-cousin some years ago, so I’d had help on getting to know my Waspe ancestors. Mary Waspe disappeared from the census records after 1881. Joseph Waspe re-married in 1891 as a widower, just before the 1891 census. (Thanks, Joseph!) I had a theory that if he remarried (which he did) and went on to have more children (which he did) there was a good chance his 2nd marriage closely followed the death of his first wife.1

Joseph Waspe, circa 1894

Joseph Waspe and Louisa Spill Evans with their son, Joseph Louis Waspe circa 1894

Death Certificate of Mary Waspe 2

I searched between the 1881 and the 1891 censuses for Mary’s death. Since Joseph had served as Porter of Clifton College in Bristol and his career there had been long, I also had a general area to search.


Notice of Joseph Waspe’s Death, The Cliftonian. 3

So I’d found evidence of Mary’s death and had confirmed that the Mary Waspe who died in 18 July 1888 was the right Mary. Normally, I find death certificates to be kind of a let-down, since they very rarely confirm much. But Mary’s was useful, as it very specifically listed the occupation of her husband. I knew he was Porter of Clifton College even after her death, so I knew I had found the correct Mary. The death certificate also gave her age at time of death, which roughly corresponded to her age in various census records.

But when did they get married? Not being the ancestral seat of the Waspe surname in Britain (likely around Norfolk & Suffolk), most (if not all) of the Waspes in the Bristol area in the late 19th century are related to Joseph Waspe, my 3rd great grandfather.

But I wasn’t going to find any more quick answers in Bristol. As a young married couple, Joseph and Mary moved around a lot. I hadn’t found any evidence of a marriage in Bristol or the Ipswich area (where I suspect Joseph is from originally). Mary Pritchard was still no more or less plausible than every other Mary I came across. I needed their marriage certificate or one of their children’s birth certificates - or both - to determine her maiden name.

I traced the family by using the census and the location of their childrens’ births, working from Bristol along a rough migration route backwards in time. From census records, it appeared that my 2x great grandfather, George Arthur, was born in Woolwich, Kent, just before the family made the move to the Bristol area. I needed to find the same maiden name on George’s birth certificate as was on Mary and Joseph’s marriage record.


Birth Certificate of George Waspe 4

Since their first child, Mary Ann Waspe (later Jeffs), a girl, was born about 1847 in the Parish of Ludlow, in Shropshire, I decided to search for Joseph’s first marriage in the same area, close to the year of Mary Ann’s birth.


Marriage Certificate of Joseph Waspe and Mary Price 5

Mary Price is right - not Mary Pritchard.

To be fair, it wasn’t all that hard, thanks to an unusual surname. It’s often spelled and transcribed incorrectly, but it seems unusual enough - and I’m getting better with wildcard searches. FreeBMD is easy enough to search and free. Searching for Marriage records of any Joseph Waspe in all counties and districts for all time periods only results in 3 records returned: my Joseph Waspe’s first marriage to Mary, a different Joseph Waspe in London and my Joseph Waspe’s 2nd marriage in 1891. There were 8 people returned on the same page on FreeBMD for Joseph’s first marriage, all in Ludlow, one of them being a Mary Pritchard. And there is a Mary Pritchard, born around Ludlow, Shropshire around 1823 whose father’s name was Richard. Still, it doesn’t explain what made the Internets glom on to Pritchard rather than Price.

It’s true I had to order some certificates to be able to find the proof I needed. While I don’t treat online trees as gospel, I’m not going to discard them outright either. They are just clues (and ways of making contact with other researchers potentially researching the same families), and I treat them the same as I would with my own Great-Aunt’s hand-written, unsourced tree. Everyone’s working habits, available resources and experience levels are different. It’s up to me to take the information I’m finding, no matter the source, and figure out what to make of it.

There is still so much research still do to on this family line. I have a PDF of a page from the 1900 Cliftonian (a magazine produced by Clifton college) sent to me by the Alumni Association at the College. I’m curious about the phrase “circumstances led to [Joseph Waspe] being absent from the College for 5 years”. What does that mean? Dr. Percival was Headmaster of Clifton College from 1862-1879, so clearly both the “circumstances” and his return to the college happened within that timeframe. According to the the 1871 census, he was Porter at the College by this time. When exactly was he not at the college? And why?

And there is the small matter of his career in the R.A. The write-up after his death mentions his Royal Artillery service prior to joining the College. He’s listed as a “Gunner, R.A.” in the 1861 Census, living with the family at Fort Redoubt in Freshwater on the Isle of Wight. Before that, the family was at Greenwich Arsenal. I’ve finally managed to find him there in the 1851 Census. Even though he and Mary had two children between their marriage and that census, they were living apart, as he was at the training facility on the night of the Census. His birthplace is wrong, and his surname was also incorrectly transcribed as “Woope” - really? - which explains why it took so long to find him. Ugh. And what I think is Mary’s 1851 Census record makes reference to her husband’s role in the R. A. But I’ve not been able to find any other records of his time in the Royal Artillery. There is a book published by the R.A. that may help.

The birth patterns of the children after his marriage to Mary could indicate that either he was away from her for part of the time or there may have been children born who did not live, so this needs more research.

Next Steps:

  • Find the birth or baptismal registration for Mary Price. Her father’s name is listed on her marriage certificate as Richard Price. Her birthplace is listed as Bishop’s Castle in every census, except for the last she appears in, 1881, when it’s the same as her daughter’s - Ludlow. They’re about 30 km apart. While I’ll need to check both, I think that her birth place is likely that from the earlier returns.
  • Figure out what is really going on in the 1851 census. I’ve found who I think is Mary living with her 2nd daughter, Esther, but not her first daughter, Mary Ann, who would only be 4 at the time - it’s got to be too early for her to be a servant? Mary Ann later turns up in Gloucestershire and marries, so she doesn’t die as a child. Where was Mary on the night of the census? Search for aunts, grandparents, other relatives.
  • I need to find out more about the lives of all of my great-great grandfather’s siblings. Note to self: Check all witnesses of all marriages.
  • I’ve read that many records of the Royal Artillery were lost in WWII due to bombing. Check to see if I can find some records of Joseph Waspe in the Royal Artillery.

Of course, I’ve got to put these all of these ‘to-dos’ away for a rainy day. It was a fun rabbit-hole, but I’ve got to climb out now.


  1. Certified copy of marriage certificate for Joseph Waspe and Louisa Spill Evans, 8 January 1891, Bristol/Gloucester Marriage Register, Page 89, No. 177, Bristol Register Office, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.
  2. Certified copy of death certificate for Mary Waspe, 18 July 1888, No. 119, Barton Regis, Clifton in the City, County of Bristol, Glouchestershire, England.
  3. The Cliftonian, June 1900.
  4. Certified copy of birth certificate for George Arthur Waspe, 29 October 1862, No. 251, Woolwich Arsenal, Greenwich, Kent, England.
  5. Certified copy of marriage certificate for Joseph Waspe and Mary Price, 4 May 1845, No. 175, Parish Church, Parish of Ludlow, County of Salop, England.
  6. N.B. Joseph’s career changed from Agricultural Labourer to Drillman from 1841 to 1845, as per 1841 Census and 1845 Marriage Certificate.
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Won’t You Be My Valentine?

My great-grandmother, Minnie Bertha Cameron (1887-1934), was named for her mother’s half-sister, someone I knew of as Minnie V. Brown or Minnie V. Gray (1866-1952). But I never knew what the “V” stood for. Until now.

Minnie V. Brown was born in Canada in 1866, a few years after her parents, George Brown (abt 1818-1914) and Elizabeth Giles (1829-1920), moved from England to a new life in Canada. Her father went from being a Cab Proprietor in London to a farmer in Simcoe County, Ontario. The stark differences in their day-to-day lives must have been shocking, to say the least.

But they persevered, like so many pioneer families, to build a new life. To not only farm, but own land and add 4 more children to the 2 that came with them from England.

Minnie, like all of their children born in Canada, was born before Civil Registration existed in Ontario, so I had to gather facts through other records, including census returns since 1871, her marriage record as well as the births of her children and their marriages.

Her own marriage took place on Valentine’s Day in 1894, which I thought was kinda cute.


In the 1901 Census of Canada, her actual birth date, February 14th, appears. It wasn’t just the year or her age, which are both more typical inclusions in census data in Canada, but the day and month as well. To me, this made the actual day of her wedding even more significant, since it was also her birthday.


When I found the marriage certificate of her son, it listed her full name, which I had never seen.

And clearly, whatever hardships George and Elizabeth suffered in their new lives, they kept their sense of humour or whimsy or joie-de-vivre or whatever-you-want-to-call-it (Englishness, maybe?), for when their 2nd daughter was born, on Valentine’s Day in 1866, they named her after the day she was born.


That “V”? It stands, of course, for Valentine.

Happy Birthday, Minnie!

Permalink for this post Map of the New City of Toronto, c. 1889, published for the Toronto City Directory /via Toronto Public Library

Map of the New City of Toronto, c. 1889, published for the Toronto City Directory /via Toronto Public Library

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The Bacon Remedy (1926)

Clearly, the reason I am still suffering from Scarlet Fever is that I have not employed the Bacon Remedy. Luckily, I have inherited a copy of the 1926 edition of Vitalogy from my great-grandparents, which covers many of the suggested treatments of the day. Now I just need to find some bacon.

Scarlet Fever usually commences suddenly, with the ordinary forerunners of fever—chills and shiverings, succeeded by hot skin, nausea, sometimes vomiting, rapid pulse, thirst, frontal headache and sore throat. The last named symptom—sore throat—is generally the earliest complained of by the patient. In about forty-eight hours after the occurrence of these symptoms, the characteristic rash is percetible, first on the breast, from whence it gradually extends to the neck, face, trunk, over the great joints and limbs, till the whole body is covered with it. The eruption is bright scarlet, and consists of innumerable red points or spots, which have been compared to a boiled lobster shell…. The color of the skin disappears on pressure, but returns on its removal…. On about the fifth day the rash generally begins to decline, and entirely disappears by about the eighth or ninth day, leaving the patient in a week condition. The subsequent process of peeling off of the cuticle is variable in its duration; it takes place in the form of scurf, from the face and trunk; but from the hands and feet large flakes are separated, sometimes coming away entire like a glove or slipper.

Dr. Stevens asserts that he has used the “cayenne gargle” in about four hundred cases of scarlet fever with almost uniform success. Now, if this were used in connection with the bacon remedy, this dreaded disease would be effectually mastered….

A very safe and remarkably sure remedy in scarlet fever, is the external use of old, uncooked fat bacon, with low diet and cooling drinks, as hereinafter given. We know many who owe their lives to this remedy, after they had been given up as incurable. It is almost marvelous, but nevertheless a fact, that of the numerous scarlet fever patients who have come under our observation through a series of years, death has rarely occurred in any stage of the disease after this remedy was applied….

It is to be used as follows: The whole surface of the body should be rubbed with the bacon twice a day. In severe cases, bind thin slices of it on the neck, breast and soles of the feet. Before the first application of bacon is made, wash the whole surface of the body with tepid water….

After the child has perspired one hour, wipe it dry and rub the whole surface of the body with bacon grease pressed out of old fat bacon; then clothe it in its nightdress, and cover with only sufficient clothing to make it comfortable.
E.H. Ruddock, M.D. 1926. Vitalogy. An encyclopedia of health and home, adapted for the home, the layman, the family. Chicago: Vitalogy Association.
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The Challenge of Elizabeth Giles

In my desire to research my direct maternal line, my challenge, though daunting, was straightforward enough: prove that my 2nd great grandmother, Elizabeth Ellen Cameron, née Starr, who I’d always thought was an orphan, wasn’t.

Funny what a word like orphan can do. As a 16-year-old who was just starting to research her family line, I figured that was that and didn’t give it any more thought.

But as I got older, something about the story I’d heard didn’t sit right. The un-sourced handwritten tree I’d gotten from my great-Aunt started to bother me, like an itch you can’t quite scratch. And the more I read online about researching female ancestors and your direct maternal line, the more intrigued I became.

Last year I decided the time was ripe for an official research project. Rather than just pick at the ancestors in my tree whenever I could, I thought I would at least attempt for some discipline. And set out to prove that Elizabeth Ellen wasn’t an “orphan” - at least in the contemporary sense of the term.

If she ever told her children she was an orphan, she would have been telling the truth. The term certainly would have applied to her in the Victorian London of her birth. In 1855, when she was only a few months old, her father, William Starr, died. A child could be considered an orphan even if only one parent was deceased. At some point, the term orphan was, in this case erroneously, interchanged with similar though not identical terms, such as “foster child” and “adopted”. All were eventually applied to Elizabeth, even though they were not true. Kind of like the family history equivalent of the ‘telephone’ game.

Regardless of what I’d believed, Elizabeth Ellen Starr actually was the daughter of the woman she came to Canada with sometime around 1859: Elizabeth Brown, formerly Starr, née Giles. George Brown was her step-father; Charles Brown, born in 1857 in London, England, her half-brother. More half-siblings would arrive once the family settled in Simcoe County, Ontario, Canada. The terminology is my own - I’m not certain that the terms “step-father” or “half-brother” and “half-sister” were ever used in this transplanted English family.

And it turns out that while my original task was untangling the origins of Elizabeth Ellen, my real challenge lay in understanding the long and twisty life of her birth mother, Elizabeth Giles. After all, she was the next link in my direct maternal line.

Elizabeth Giles was born April 20, 1829 in Ealing, Middlesex, England, the daughter of John Giles and Hester/Esther [Unknown, possibly Stanton]. The family lived for several decades in Hendon, Middlesex, England.

Elizabeth Giles might have been living as a servant one street away from William Starr at the time of the 1851 census. By their 1854 marriage, she was listed as living on what I believe is Lisson Grove [?] in St. Marylebone Parish, Middlesex, England.

William Starr lived in the same house his parents had lived in before his own father passed away in 1853: 14 Hamilton Mews, in St John, Marylebone, Middlesex, England. From the time of the 1851 census until his death, he worked as both a painter and a plumber.

William died in November 1855 of pulmonary tuberculosis, leaving Elizabeth a widow with 7 month old Elizabeth Ellen. In January 1857, the young widow married George Brown, a cab proprietor. When a son, Charles Brown, was born in November 1857, the family was living at 17 Randolph Mews, Paddington.

According to census records in Canada, Elizabeth Giles and George Brown moved their young family to Canada in 1859. I continued to search for more evidence of Elizabeth’s maiden name in Canadian vital records, but George and Elizabeth’s additional children were born in Ontario in the 1860s, where civil registration did not begin until July 1869.

In 1859, George Brown purchased 20 acres of land in Oro Township, in Simcoe County. It’s possible that Charles Brown also held land in the area as a young man. Possibly I’ll be able to find some additional information in land records.

Unfortunately, the registration of Elizabeth’s death in 1920 didn’t shed any light on her identity. It was filed by her son-in-law, who for some reason is listed as her brother-in-law. Her father is identified as a Mr. Johns (not John Giles). Odd that he got that wrong, since his eldest daughter had his mother-in-law’s maiden name as a middle name!

George and Elizabeth’s tombstone was transcribed as part of Bethesda Congregational Church cemetery in Oro Township, Simcoe County. On my visit last summer, the tombstone was tipped over and too heavy to move, so I’ll have to see if the information on the stone is available in the full transcription. Or bring some tools so that I can lift it!

Next Steps:

  • Obtain death certificate of Elizabeth Ellen Cameron, née Starr
  • Find any land records or will in Canada for George Brown
  • Find transcription of tombstone of Elizabeth Brown, née Giles
  • Find any vital records of the half-siblings on Elizabeth Ellen, born in England or Ontario
  • Research the siblings of Elizabeth Giles in England
  • Look into vital records of the Congregational Church in Ontario
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In Which Ford Motor Works is Visited

Tuesday, July 25, 1950 - 85 degrees

Nice day, after lunch we went out to visit the Ford Motor Works. Faith, Sarah and I, we started the tour at 2 p.m. It took us two hours to go through the Plant, Reggie had arranged everything for us, the guide is a friend of Reggie, we started one end of the plant where the first part of a Car is made, the guide explaining everything as we went along, to every machine. There are 14,600 machines in one plant, and they produce 580 Cars every day. The Ford Factory employs 14,500 men, we saw the first part of a car made, and every other part made until the Car came out complete the other end, we were about 40 people. The Ford Company had a Bus to take us from one Plant to another. I have never seen such machinery in all my life. Reggie had arranged with this Mr. Parker to take Faith, Sarah and I to see the Hospital belonging to the Ford Works, as soon as the other visitors had gone. He got a Car and took us through the Hospital, after all the other people had gone, as they are not aloud to visit the Hospital, but we had the privilage of going through, as Reggie works as a clerk for the Doctor of the Hospital. So we were shown right through, everybody was nice. Reggie shown us around every room, I could write a book on all I saw on this tour, everything was so clean and up to date, we saw many patients having treatment while we were there, we then left for home, this Mr. Parker drove us home in the Car, we should never forget this tour of the Ford Motor Works in Canada, during our visit.

A journal entry from Ivor Joseph (ca 1888-?), who, in the summer of 1950, traveled to Windsor, Ontario, Canada from Wales with his wife, Sarah (née Nicholas) to visit Arthur Edwin Waspe and Mary Faith (née Nicholas). He kept a daily record of his trip in a Grafton Exercise Book.

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A Day at the Office

My paternal grandfather, Reginald Waspe (1917-2001), was born in Wales on December 16, 1917 and came to Canada in October 1919 aboard the Grampian, two months shy of his 2nd birthday. He settled in Windsor, Ontario with his father, Arthur Edwin Waspe, his mother, Mary Faith Nicholas and his older brother, George Nunn Waspe. He lived in Windsor for the rest of his life. He started working at Ford Motor Company sometime around 1939 and married my grandmother, Frances Louise Deneau (1920-1984), in September 1940.

I’ve always liked these pictures of him at work. He was the second generation of my family to work at Ford Motor Co. (there have subsequently been two more generations) and worked there for 43 years. My great grandfather was the first to work at ‘Fords’ (as it’s called in Windsor) after emigrating from Wales.

I’ve been reading my great-great Uncle Ivor’s travel journal he kept while on a trip to Windsor in 1950 and love the glimpses into my grandfather’s life as a young husband, father and employee. (I only noticed the small portraits of my dad and aunt beside the stapler on my grandfather’s desk today, which is pretty sweet.)

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Thursday June 15, 1950
Faith, Sarah and I went to town by bus, that is Windsor. We never saw such sights you cant imagine how the Traffic goes, Thousands of Cars passing back and fore, we went inside one large store what a sight, you could buy anything from a pin to an elephant. then we went in to the Post office the floors and the walls were all marble marvelous building. after that we had Fish and Chips kept by a Welshman named Edwards, what a difference to the way we are served at home, everything so clean and up to date. Then we got on the bus for home, they have a wonderfull system on the buses here, there is no Conductor Only the driver, you go in the bus by an automatic door you drop a nickle into a machine by the driver, if theres is any change he hands it to you from this machine. When you want to leave the Bus you pull the cord yourself and the Driver pulls up next stop, when the bus stops you leave the bus by anotehr door that opens automaticaly, everything works like clock work. We got home, we had some friends of Edwin & Faith for the Evening, it was gone 12 o’clock when we went to bed.


A journal entry from Ivor Joseph (ca 1888-?), who, in the summer of   1950, traveled to Windsor, Ontario, Canada from Wales with his wife,   Sarah (née Nicholas) to visit Arthur Edwin Waspe and Mary Faith (née   Nicholas). He kept a daily record of his trip in a Grafton Exercise   Book.

Thursday June 15, 1950

Faith, Sarah and I went to town by bus, that is Windsor. We never saw such sights you cant imagine how the Traffic goes, Thousands of Cars passing back and fore, we went inside one large store what a sight, you could buy anything from a pin to an elephant. then we went in to the Post office the floors and the walls were all marble marvelous building. after that we had Fish and Chips kept by a Welshman named Edwards, what a difference to the way we are served at home, everything so clean and up to date. Then we got on the bus for home, they have a wonderfull system on the buses here, there is no Conductor Only the driver, you go in the bus by an automatic door you drop a nickle into a machine by the driver, if theres is any change he hands it to you from this machine. When you want to leave the Bus you pull the cord yourself and the Driver pulls up next stop, when the bus stops you leave the bus by anotehr door that opens automaticaly, everything works like clock work. We got home, we had some friends of Edwin & Faith for the Evening, it was gone 12 o’clock when we went to bed.

A journal entry from Ivor Joseph (ca 1888-?), who, in the summer of 1950, traveled to Windsor, Ontario, Canada from Wales with his wife, Sarah (née Nicholas) to visit Arthur Edwin Waspe and Mary Faith (née Nicholas). He kept a daily record of his trip in a Grafton Exercise Book.

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Tuesday June 13 1950
Faith wanted us to do go down to the Stores with her to do some shopping, what a sight, you go inside and you go around the stalls and choose what you want and put it in a little hand trawley, you push it along to the next stall, then you just take all you want, from every stall. every thing is wrapped up in cellophene paper, anything you could imagine in the line of food, fish, meat, poultry all in cold storage in glass cases so that you could see everything, greengrocery & fruit of all kinds, after you had all you want you push this little trawley to a machine, then the fellow by this machine checks all you have bought this machine gives the price of everything, then you pay him and he packs everything in a big brown paper bag, then we get in the Car and off home.
In the evening, we visited Reggie’s home we stayed there for a few hours together, we had an enjoyable evening. then we got in the Car and drove alongside of the river between us and America,  we saw some beautifull sights, passed the Ford Motor Works, and finealy arrived home

A journal entry from Ivor Joseph (ca 1888-?), who, in the summer of  1950, traveled to Windsor, Ontario, Canada from Wales with his wife,  Sarah (née Nicholas) to visit Arthur Edwin Waspe and Mary Faith (née  Nicholas). He kept a daily record of his trip in a Grafton Exercise  Book.

Tuesday June 13 1950

Faith wanted us to do go down to the Stores with her to do some shopping, what a sight, you go inside and you go around the stalls and choose what you want and put it in a little hand trawley, you push it along to the next stall, then you just take all you want, from every stall. every thing is wrapped up in cellophene paper, anything you could imagine in the line of food, fish, meat, poultry all in cold storage in glass cases so that you could see everything, greengrocery & fruit of all kinds, after you had all you want you push this little trawley to a machine, then the fellow by this machine checks all you have bought this machine gives the price of everything, then you pay him and he packs everything in a big brown paper bag, then we get in the Car and off home.

In the evening, we visited Reggie’s home we stayed there for a few hours together, we had an enjoyable evening. then we got in the Car and drove alongside of the river between us and America,  we saw some beautifull sights, passed the Ford Motor Works, and finealy arrived home

A journal entry from Ivor Joseph (ca 1888-?), who, in the summer of 1950, traveled to Windsor, Ontario, Canada from Wales with his wife, Sarah (née Nicholas) to visit Arthur Edwin Waspe and Mary Faith (née Nicholas). He kept a daily record of his trip in a Grafton Exercise Book.

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Sunday June 11, 1950
Sunday Evening We went for a drive in the Car with Edwin & Faith we drove along Windsor City, we saw some beautifull sites, we went as far as the river between us and America we passed the Sky Scrapers of Detroit it is a wonderfull site, we have seen more Cars here in one day than we have ever seen. then we returned home and had supper, then we had a long chat until 12 o’clock, then we went to bed and slept like a rock.

A journal entry from Ivor Joseph (ca 1888-?), who, in the summer of 1950, traveled to Windsor, Ontario, Canada from Wales with his wife, Sarah (née Nicholas) to visit Arthur Edwin Waspe and Mary Faith (née Nicholas). He kept a daily record of his trip in a Grafton Exercise Book.

Sunday June 11, 1950

Sunday Evening We went for a drive in the Car with Edwin & Faith we drove along Windsor City, we saw some beautifull sites, we went as far as the river between us and America we passed the Sky Scrapers of Detroit it is a wonderfull site, we have seen more Cars here in one day than we have ever seen. then we returned home and had supper, then we had a long chat until 12 o’clock, then we went to bed and slept like a rock.

A journal entry from Ivor Joseph (ca 1888-?), who, in the summer of 1950, traveled to Windsor, Ontario, Canada from Wales with his wife, Sarah (née Nicholas) to visit Arthur Edwin Waspe and Mary Faith (née Nicholas). He kept a daily record of his trip in a Grafton Exercise Book.